Kaitlin Mullins

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edited-1901

Kaitlin Mullins
ART 4593 – Photographic Portfolio II
Digital prints; printed size TBD
part of an ongoing series

My final series references the fragmented nature of memory – the peculiar nature of memory association, including what can trigger a memory, the emotion or feeling brought about or resulting from some memory stimulus, and the inconsistencies involving mental images. In the context of a grief process reconciling my relationship with my late father, images depict everyday scenery with a nostalgic, emotional focus on relics of our pasts.

8 thoughts on “Kaitlin Mullins

  1. I really love the idea you have here. Nostalgia is the first thing I see looking at your photos. I like their simplicity and recognizability as well–even though we all have completely different pasts, images like a child’s play set and family photos on the wall are familiar to most. Something I thought might be interesting to better integrate your notion of the fragmented nature of memory would be taking the photos closer up and cutting out more of the objects. It could still be recognizable but more fragmented than it’s original form. Just an idea, I think your photos are great.

  2. Nice composition in these two photographs. I particularly like the tension created in the first photograph by how close the frame on the right is to the edge of the frame. I think this emphasizes the memory association/triggering of memory that you were going for.

  3. I like the theme of nostalgia, I think a lot of viewers can relate to the idea of documentation and looking back through images. Excellence perspective on the first image. The second image has great composition, but perhaps changing the angle of view or perspective could benefit the image. Great use of color as well!

  4. These are very powerful images that really address your theme of nostalgia well. The first image especially, because many of us look to photographs that freeze a moment of time in someone’s life. It is interesting to look back at time and realize how much you have grown as an individual and what aspects in your life provide that. The second image I feel is not as intriguing as the first put still is able to stand on it’s own. I would love to see more in this series, since it is a difficult theme to address, especially one that deals with emotional trauma.

  5. I find these images very interesting and intriguing especially the idea of nostalgia and memories. The swing set would trigger and emotion or memory in most viewers and the the perspective of the frames in interesting.

  6. I think your are doing a wonderful job relaying that concept of time passed that is inherently related to nostalgia. In the top picture, the past is simply referenced by the materials of different eras (like the stucko and textured wall paper) and in the bottom by the leaves collecting on the slide indicating it has not been for some time. I like that they are nuanced studies and give the viewer an open narrative that everyone can relate to. They are documentation of nostalgic relics which is why I think you should shoot these scenes as directly as possible. The soft focus is a distracting element in the top image. Though soft focus is a device that can be used to make an image feel nostalgia, but in this image the nostalgia is already present. It convolutes it in a way, adding more narrative than you need and less of a sense of the place and the objects.

  7. I love your concept overall – capturing small things that can trigger a memory – something that is very familiar to all of us. The top image I feel is more successful at depicting that as it is in the home, however the bottom image is well done too. Good eye for framing. Something I think your images could benefit from is editing color tones in post-production to give it a more nostalgic feel – muted tones possibly. Great work!

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