photography, Western Michigan University

Brandon Smith

b1

b2

b3

b4

Brandon Smith
Art 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 8.5 x 11 inches
Images for project about the book, “Nobody’s Ever Missing” by Catherine Lacey.

I am going to attempt to visually convey feelings of escapism, loss, and separation. I want these photos to have a very abstract aesthetic and have them portray more of a feeling related to the emotions rather than contain literal subject matter. I’m more interested in capturing the feel or look of this book through a first person perspective as opposed to showing a second person experience.

For this project I have been experimenting with capturing fleeting colors and movement to convey the idea that one person or experience cannot be confined to a single time or place. Mental conditions such as autism or depression are considered as spectrum disorders. This means that the subject exhibits symptoms of a certain illness but the extent of their illness is unknown which means it can’t be quantified. I find this to be a very interesting topic for discussion and one I would like to explore with this project.

Nobody Is Ever Missing addresses the actions taken by a woman who is not satisfied with her life that she once found satisfying. I feel this resonates very well with the constant state of change found in the natural world. Her experience is also very relatable because as humans we are constantly learning and changing.

Some ideas I had for photos involved using muted, washed out colors. I also wanted to accompany these colors with motion blurs and ominous shadows. As far as content in these photos, I want to capture soft textures and shadows as well as ambient lighting. I think this will better show the feelings of depression as opposed to using things like bright colors or hard lines which may give a more harsh emotional response. These images will be medium in size roughly around 8×10 inches.

photography, Western Michigan University

John Rapanotti

john1

john2

john3

john4

John Rapanotti
ART 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints – 8.5×11

This series of photographs is inspired by the novel The Alchemist. The main underlying theme is following your dreams; finding a way to achieve your destiny. I have attempted to portray this as a very serious and delicate matter, using the lamp to represent one’s inner passion or want to achieve their deepest desire. That desire is a gift, and when your passion is burning it lights the way through the darkness and guides you. Though if you are not careful with your gift, when an obstacle arises it can easily extinguish your light; leaving you lost in the darkness.

photography, U of Wisconsin, Madison

Alexandra Bramstadt

Image1_Photoexchange

Image2_Photoexchange

Image3_Photoexchange

Image4_Photoexchange

Alexandra Bramstadt
Art 576: Photography
Digital Prints; 8.5 X 10

I’ve been working strongly with books and using various methods of destruction and capturing the way the books have been effected through the process of this destruction. These images were planted into a pot with some seeds and I took pictures along with the process of the plants growing. I used the images to show the way that the water, sunlight, dirt, etc worked to grow the plants alongside the way these elements worked with the destruction of the books.

photography, Western Michigan University

Luis Sanchez

luis1

luis2

luis3

venlafaxine-HCL-ER-(Effexor-ER)

Luis Sanchez
ART 3470: Digital Photography 1
Digital Prints; 11in x 14in
20 photo series

I took inspiration from the book “Go Ask Alice”. The book is an anonymous diary of a teenage girl who struggles with drug addiction. She doesn’t have many friends and her family ends up moving in the beginning of the book. She starts fresh at a new school and meets some people who later invite her to a party. She takes her first drug, LSD (Acid), at the party and feels welcomed by the people there. Soon after she felt a sense of belonging when she did drugs with those people. Her life started getting out of control and she got into doing harder drugs like Heroin an Crack and she went down a deep dark path of drug addiction and even prostitution. I wanted to steer away from making my series about people using drugs recreationally. Instead of using drugs that are typically used recreationally such as: LSD, MDMA, Cocaine, Marijuana, etc; I researched the top 20 most popular psychiatric drugs prescribed in the US. I wanted to dig further into drug addiction and focus on some mental illnesses that can lead to drug addiction such as depression and anxiety. Each photo in the series is titled as a mental illness drug with the scientific name followed by the brand name, for example; alprazolam (Xanax). In each photo you can see a human with the chemical structure of the drug in their titles floating around them. I wanted to express the drugs in a unique way while keeping the theme of mental illness present.

photography, U of Wisconsin, Madison

Dakota Mace

DSC_4232

DSC_4219 copy

Dakota Mace
ART 576: Advanced Photography
Digital Prints; 8″x11″

The Navajo Textile Project focuses on the restoration and documentation of unique Navajo Blankets that have been influenced by the English language. The project will look into the issues of cultural identification within traditional and contemporary Navajos lifestyles. The collection is of great importance and needs to be seen by the world because it gives a glimpse into the history of Navajo weaving that has occurred in the past 100 years.

The idea for the project originated from Jamie Ross, a longtime collector of Navajo Blankets. The collection itself is housed in Mineral Point, Wisconsin, and includes over 700 blankets that vary in design and age. The intention of the project was to photograph each blankets but later developed into the idea of creating a book as well as exhibition for the pieces that are influenced by the English language.

Images photographed are part of the project, and are portraits of Jamie Ross. I used two different lighting techniques and wanted to know which portrait works best.

photography, U of Wisconsin, Madison

Tyler Madey

madey_stranger43
Stranger no. 43

madey_stranger47
Stranger no. 47

Tyler Madey
Art 476: Intermediate Photography
Digital Prints; 8.5 x 11

Statement: These images are a part of my Strangers series. Strangers is a series of portraits that shows there are similarities between one another. My process is to approach random people on the streets and ask to take their pictures. The subjects are composed through similar framing, calling attention to the similarities inherent within their individual beauty and uniqueness.

photography, Western Michigan University

Theodore Jones

ted1

ted2

ted3

ted4

Theodore Jones
ART 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 24″ x 16″

Deer Vs. Human: These four photos were a part of my 20 images for my final project they show the differences in the eyes of a human compared to a deer. All of my images are buck rubs. The deers eye view has less color and less detail. The reason for this is that the research that has been done in the past on deers eye had given me the color and shads that used in my photos. Because truthfully who knows how others see?

photography, Western Michigan University

Deon Mixon

deon1

deon2

deon3

Deon Mixon
ART 3470 Digital Photography I
digital prints; 12″ x 10″
Series: Being: Anomaly
20 photos: 3 of 20 (+1 of the initial 2 sent= 4 total provided from the series; excluding the other of the first two sent)

Description:
Being: Anomaly explores the phenomenon in which an individual can be present within a natural, realistic realm, but also present and/or originate from a rather surrealistic or supernatural realm. The emphasis is on the mystery and discovering of the self within this dual-realm, or single-world where two realms have been united because of the individual’s intrinsic and distinctive being. Discovering the purpose of the self and understanding the self itself within such a world where two realms meet is the focus.

These are Being 13, 18, and 20.

photography, Western Michigan University

John Warren

wwz_for_web

wwz_for_web2

wwz_for_web3

John Warren
Art 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 8.5 x 11 inches
Final photos for book project, World War Z

In the book World War Z, it is meant to be an oral history. The book is made up of fictional people being interviewed on how they dealt with the zombie war, what happened to them, and how they overcame such an experience. I am interested in the humanity aspect of the book World War Z, because no matter what happens to the people in the book they all share the common bond of being human and have somewhat similar reactions to the zombie war. Much of the book is about learning from awful experiences and growing on from that to be stronger from it. I attempted to show something similar through photography. Specifically, I focused on the disconnection between people, and how people often times feel the most connected after a traumatic event has happened.

photography, U of Wisconsin, Madison

Alex Michalowski

mitch_1

mitch

sarah_1

sarah

Alex Michalowski
Art 476: Intermediate Photography
Digital Prints; 8″ x 10″
4/20

I am working to decontextualize humans through the subjectivity of names.
The quotes and names are found graffiti which were written on the wall by the named person. The image of the full face shows the name and the zoomed in image is the quote that person left on the wall. It is important to note that the model’s names are NOT the ones depicted but rather I wish to highlight how names are purely subjective and we, as humans, tend to always take them at face value despite how much someone’s name may truly mean.

photography, Western Michigan University

Megan Bahus

Photo-10---Marine-Igauna-WEB

Photo-11---Endangered-Butterflies-WEB

Photo-6---South-China-Tiger-WEB

Photo-8---Bluefin-Tuna-WEB

Megan Bahus Art 3470 – Digital Photography 1 Photo Manipulation Digital Prints; ideally 12′ x 24″ 20 Images Total The Endangered Sequence This series explores the ideas of everyday human habitation combined with existing alongside our animal counterparts specifically the endangered. These photos explore ideas and questions raised by a book trilogy I am reading known as “The Partial Sequence” by Dan Wells. The book series explores a post-apocalyptic world in which the humans were poorly effected but there were no mention of the animals that survived as well; they were seemingly unaffected and thus my curiosities about this irony was born. These photos are meant to be posted as card stock flyers to be flung along the campuses as the animal rights activist scream “be an advocate!” or to be printed in large, mini billboard format to confront the daily driver as they speed down 94 avoiding the boys in blue.

photography, Western Michigan University

Jessi Thran

jt2

jt1

jt3

jt4

Jessi Thran
Art 3470: Digital Photography
Digital Prints; 8″ x 10″
4 out of a series of 20

These images are inspired by the book “Looking for Alaska” by John Green. The book focuses on this “Great Perhaps”; the things you’ll do and they people you’ll meet. Relating it to my life, the little and random things I do in life that bring meaning to it.

photography, Western Michigan University

Ryan West

fusion-#3

fusion1

Ryan West
ART 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 11″ x 14″

These two photos are inspired by the book “Bridge to Terabithia” by Katherine Paterson. The photos are intended to take your eyes on an imaginary adventure by splitting the image in half. One side of the photo is reality and the other side fantasy.

photography, Western Michigan University

Brandon Smith

hand

waterdrops

Brandon Smith
Art 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 8.5 x 11 inches
Test shots for project about the book, “Nobody’s Ever Missing” by Catherine Lacey.

I am going to attempt to visually convey feelings of escapism, loss, and separation. I want these photos to have a very abstract aesthetic and have them portray more of a feeling related to the emotions rather than contain literal subject matter. I’m more interested in capturing the feel or look of this book through a first person perspective as opposed to showing a second person experience.

For this project I have been experimenting with capturing fleeting colors and movement to convey the idea that one person or experience cannot be confined to a single time or place. Mental conditions such as autism or depression are considered as spectrum disorders. This means that the subject exhibits symptoms of a certain illness but the extent of their illness is unknown which means it can’t be quantified. I find this to be a very interesting topic for discussion and one I would like to explore with this project.

Nobody Is Ever Missing addresses the actions taken by a woman who is not satisfied with her life that she once found satisfying. I feel this resonates very well with the constant state of change found in the natural world. Her experience is also very relatable because as humans we are constantly learning and changing.

Some ideas I had for photos involved using muted, washed out colors. I also wanted to accompany these colors with motion blurs and ominous shadows. As far as content in these photos, I want to capture soft textures and shadows as well as ambient lighting. I think this will better show the feelings of depression as opposed to using things like bright colors or hard lines which may give a more harsh emotional response. These images will be medium in size roughly around 8×10 inches.

photography, Western Michigan University

Erin Bobbitt

IMG_9147 (2)sm

IMG_9890 (2)sm

sm

Erin Bobbitt
5480 Photo Workshop
Digital Prints; 13×19 inches
27 images total (and counting)

These images are part of a large series of high school yearbook inspired portraits, with a supernatural twist. I was inspired to create these because of a love for teen film archetypes (specifically from the 1990s) as well as the young adult horror fiction I read when I was younger. My goal is to create these characters we are so used to seeing different versions of, and put them in a world where the supernatural, such as vampires, werewolves and witches are commonplace. If someone goes missing, or the full moon causes transformations, it is “just another day” for these teens. No matter what world we live in, real or imaginary, we don’t acknowledge smears of blood or glowing eyes, because we’re polite, afraid, or we just don’t want to cause a stir. It is humorous, and I want viewers to wonder about the fictional lives of these characters they don’t know.

photography, Western Michigan University

Megan Bahus

Photo 1 Web

Photo 3 Web

Megan Bahus
Art 3470 – Digital Photography 1
Photo Manipulation Digital Print
8.5″ x 10″ (ideally 12′ x 24′”)
20 Images Total
The Endangered Sequence

This series explores the ideas of everyday human habitation combined with existing alongside our animal counterparts specifically the endangered. These photos explore ideas and questions raised by a book trilogy I am reading known as “The Partial Sequence” by Dan Wells. The book series explores a post-apocalyptic world in which the humans were poorly effected but there were no mention of the animals that survived as well; they were seemingly unaffected and thus my curiosities about this irony was born. These photos are meant to be posted as card stock flyers to be flung along the campuses as the animal rights activist scream “be an advocate!” or to be printed in large, mini billboard format to confront the daily driver as they speed down 94 avoiding the boys in blue.

photography, Western Michigan University

Destine Wells

wells_d_DSC_0218_web

wells_d_DSC_0222_web

wells_d_DSC_0223_web

wells_d_DSC_0232_web

Destine Wells
ART 5480: Photography Workshop
Digital Prints; 13″ x 19″

Title: Fearfully and Chemically Made, 2015

This series plays with the idea that model have a pressure to look a certain way and our food is becoming the same way. Models and food are made to look pleasing to the consumers, but they are becoming unhealthy. In this series I play with both fruits and vegetables and foods that are seen as processed. Each type of food creates a different message as it interacts with the models on the runway.

photography, Western Michigan University

Courtney Rorick

Courtney_Rorick_Bulb

Courtney_Rorick_Dress

Courtney Rorick
ART 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 11″ x 17″

Based off the book Rebecca by Daphne du Maurier, my goal is to photograph pictures that represent the eerie and ominous nature of the book. Also to take pictures that invoke the question why, and a desire for the reasoning beyond the photo. In the book Rebecca a lot of information is withheld from the reader and I aim to do the same with this series of photos.

photography, Western Michigan University

John Warren

wwz

wwz2

John Warren
Art 3470: Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 8.5 x 11 inches
Test shots for project about the book, World War Z

In the book World War Z, it is meant to be an oral history. The book is made up of fictional people being interviewed on how they dealt with the zombie war, what happened to them, and how they overcame such an experience. I am very interested in the humanity aspect of the book World War Z, because no matter what happens to the people in the book they all share the common bond of being human and have somewhat similar reactions to the zombie war. Much of the book is about learning from awful experiences and growing on from that to be stronger from it. I would like to do something similar visually with photographs.

photography, Western Michigan University

Elizabeth Brosofske

_MG_7790-copy

_MG_7825-copy

Elizabeth Brosofske
Art 3470 Digital Photography I
Digital Prints; 8″ x 10″
(In a series of 20, although I am not sure what I am calling it yet…)

In my photographs, I am inspired by the novel “The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon” by Stephen King. I strive to capture the hope and fear that one encounters when they are lost. In the book, the main character is literally lost in the woods, but she is also lost emotionally. Dealing with family matters and other factors has her second guessing what she has always known to do. I am currently working on images to capture the contrast of fear and hope in these “lost” situations.