photography, Rollins College

Ari Schubot

Ari Schubot
ART 300: Photography II
Digital Prints; 13×17
5 images in this series

As an Environmental Major and Studio Art Major, I find it essential that I use my knowledge about the environment and my skills as a photographer to make my viewers aware of their environment and by doing this it will hopefully make them more conscious of their actions regarding the environment. This series is about me/ the artist wanting to show my viewers that nature in an urban setting is always in sight of something man-made. I find it very interesting how most plant life within an urban setting has been removed and something manicured has replaced it. I want to emphasize the feeling of containment which Is ironic because nature is supposed to be wild.

photography, Rollins College

Zinnia Upson

Zinnia Upson
ART300: Photography 2 Theory and Practice
Digital Prints; Sizes varying

I wanted to investigate the life of bees through observation. As not a lot of people know the bees are in danger of extinction from Colony Collapse Disorder. This is a growing problem across the United States and even large parts of Europe. I wanted to take a different angle and try to find these bees in their natural habitat and observe them and observe where they are not. A big part of bringing awareness is to show the future without these little creatures. I also think humans do not know the impact that will happen if we fail to help these creatures. I sought out to show an aspect of observing bees gathering pollen from local flowers and then to show the flowers with missing bees because of the decline in the bee population.

photography, University of Kentucky

Jack Bennett

Jack Bennett
A-S 285: Lens Art
Digital Prints; 11×8 Inches

I started by thinking about what I wanted to do for my surrealism project. I always refer to the supernatural in this case. The scenery and the props I used in my photos I thought added a great detail of fear, mysteriousness, and anxiety. I created this place where bad people and occurrences happen. Anyone who goes in this house doesn’t come out.

The baby masks are used for the new members of the house and nearly all compositions have it. The story starts with a curious girl who goes to the house. She hides from the members of the house, scared, but she is inevitably caught. The next scene is a composition of that monster in your closet. This house has its monster and its where you go when initiated as a new member of the house. I feel as though I have depicted a true sense of fear and anxiety in the shots I took. The third is an interaction between two members of the house. A character listens to the other character who talks while concealing a knife. This shows that new members of the house aren’t always trusted so the character with the knife feels that they shouldn’t trust the newest member. The newest member of the house is depicted in the rest of the photos, giving in to her new way of life, luring a family member black cat away from his home and hiding in her hiding spot under the staircase.

The baby mask and dark elements were a big part in making the scene feel scary. I’ve been influenced lately by Eugene Meatyard who is a big photographer in surrealism. His main theme involves concealing the face to show emotion in a multitude of things. I also get an influence from the time of the year which Is Halloween right now. The main themes I show from these photos are themes of family, dark emotions, anxiety, and a story; If the photos are set up in the right order: two masked and one unmasked people, the door, the interaction between members, the cat luring, and hiding in the closet. The visuals in the project I feel give a strong representation of these elements.

photography, University of Kentucky

Mason Barron

Mason Barron
A-S285 Lens Arts
Digital Prints; 8×10
Narrative Series- 5 Images

This project was inspired by Ava Berkofsky, the director of photography for HBO’s Insecure. After experiencing her work, I wanted to try and better my skills with what little materials I had. To complete the illusion of studio lighting I used a ten dollar light grey photo backdrop and multiple five dollar rolls of colored cellophane. I knew that if I wanted to continue to lift up the people and communities I care about, I had to be inclusive of them all. I have to know how to properly photograph them all. This project was so much more than just a friend study once I saw the reactions of the people involved in this project. This slowly turned into a narrative of empowerment and solidarity for some of the people I love and care for most. These photographs are entirely for them, I just happened to take them. I knew that my goal by the end of this project would to inspire, invest, and embolden those who need it the most.

photography, University of Kentucky

Kevin Truhlar Jr.

Kevin Truhlar Jr.
A-S 285 – Lens Arts
digital photographs; 6 2/3″ x 10″
Series of 5 images (4 included)

Statement: This series of work explores that concept of being reliant on, yet simultaneously struggling with technology. I used myself as a model because of my own personal interest in this topic, but I wanted to use a silhouette-style lighting to give a more faceless appearance to the works. Even though we now live in a more wireless generation, cables are still a physical representation of technology and without them nearly all of our gadgets will not work, much like how many others and I feel like we cannot function unless we’re connected to the internet in some capacity.

photography, University of Kentucky

Annabel Hisle

Annabel Hisle
A-S 28: Lens Art
Digital Prints; 8×10
5 total images in series

This series highlights the mundane routines of most mornings for many people, which includes brushing your teeth, putting on makeup, and taking a series of medications. Mental health has become more of an open topic in recent years, and many people suffer from some sort of mental illness. Morning routines differ for everyone. Mornings can be much harder for those who suffer, getting out of bed can be more than a taxing job. Taking a multitude of medications has become as habitual as brushing your teeth for many people these days.

photography, Western Michigan University

Kaitlyn Rode

Kaitlyn Rode
ART 5480: Photography Workshop
Digital Inkjet Prints; 23″ x 15″
There will be 12 in the series

“To the person in the bell jar, blank and stopped as a dead baby, the world itself is the bad dream.” – Sylvia Plath

The Bell Jar was published in 1963 and written by the American poet Sylvia Plath. For this series of work, I use The Bell Jar as a map of female expectation, mental illness, and growth; themes that have had constant relevance in my own life. I focus on young women going through a similar metamorphosis as I, and often similar pains. Each photo is inspired by a different quote from the novel that I portrayed not as an illustration but as a visualization of what that quote means to me and how I relate. As a result, this series works as a link between Sylvia Plath’s semi-autobiography, my experiences, and countless other young women’s stories.

Plath, Sylvia. The Bell Jar. Harper Collins, 1971.

photography, U of Wisconsin, Madison

Conley Clark

Conley Clark
ART 576: Advanced Photography
Archival inkjet print, wood block, plaster

Statement: The current focus of my research in both materiality and imagery is the slippage that often occurs between the erotic and traumatic. I am interested in exploring the intersection of these two terms in relation to the queer male body and site-specific places of intimacy and memory: places of vulnerability, but those which are also potent with sexuality and virility, often serving as backdrops for violence against queer individuals.

photography, Western Michigan University

Emily Merlo

Emily Merlo
ART 4470: Digital Photography II
Digital Prints; 16×24
8 Images total

Statement: In my life, I struggle with depression and dissociation. My body is in the physical world, but my brain often tends to drift away. By blocking out the face and head, I dehumanize the subject of the photographs, only leaving the hands to represent the small pieces of humanity a person with depression can afford to show the world. The empty spaces are left to make the viewer ponder where the subject’s mind is in relation to their body. They also express the loneliness felt in day-to-day life. We pass hundreds of strangers a day, without remembering any details other than the fact that they have a human form.