photography, Rollins College

Elizabeth Shugart

Elizabeth Shugart
ART 300: Photography 2 Theory and Practices
Digital Prints; 13×17
5 photos out of a series of 15

In this project I am looking at the manipulation and control of water in Florida and the development that this enables, whether agricultural or housing, and the impacts of both. In a human world, the natural flow of water crosses our lawns, roads, and agriculture picking up chemicals we use to fertilize our lawns and agriculture and the oil released from cars along the way. These elements are far from natural, pervading the ecosystem, impacting its ability to function properly as the new elements are foreign and unnatural. This project seeks to capture or suggest these human inputs into the ecosystem through capturing the sources of the pollutants and the methods of controlling water.

photography, Rollins College

Thomas Wheatley

Thomas Wheatley
ART: 300. Photography II
Digital Prints; 8×11

In this series, focus on this fantasy world that I have made up in my head. I wanted to elaborate more on the unknowing and uncertainty someone can feel when dropped into a place they are unfamiliar with. These images are apart of a series that follow my imagination, which is a made up fantasy world that you can feel and smell when looking at these photographs. Being from the north, I have always been fascinated by the different “seasons” Florida gets compared to up north. The typical Florida whether is an essential role in my work, as I play with water, rainfall, the sunrise and sunsets, and the mist that rises in the morning. All of these natural causes help me express more the magical idea I am trying to portray.

photography, Rollins College

Angela-Maria Martinez

Angela-Maria Martinez
Art 300 Photography II: Theory and Practice
Digital prints; 17 x 22
Series of 20 images

The images I capture reflect the correlation between the unknown and the uncanny. Through the objects and situations displayed in these photographs, I intend to capture the cautious wonder with which we regard the “unreachable unfamiliar,” and how the act of exhibiting the “other” adds a barrier of separation that impedes us from accurately understanding and accepting what we see. Although we may experience various degrees of curiosity and appreciation for the endless foreign entities we confront, our inherent nature and cultured experiences force us to approach what is unclear with weariness.

photography, Rollins College

Ari Schubot

Ari Schubot
ART 300: Photography II
Digital Prints; 13×17
5 images in this series

As an Environmental Major and Studio Art Major, I find it essential that I use my knowledge about the environment and my skills as a photographer to make my viewers aware of their environment and by doing this it will hopefully make them more conscious of their actions regarding the environment. This series is about me/ the artist wanting to show my viewers that nature in an urban setting is always in sight of something man-made. I find it very interesting how most plant life within an urban setting has been removed and something manicured has replaced it. I want to emphasize the feeling of containment which Is ironic because nature is supposed to be wild.

photography, Rollins College

Zinnia Upson

Zinnia Upson
ART300: Photography 2 Theory and Practice
Digital Prints; Sizes varying

I wanted to investigate the life of bees through observation. As not a lot of people know the bees are in danger of extinction from Colony Collapse Disorder. This is a growing problem across the United States and even large parts of Europe. I wanted to take a different angle and try to find these bees in their natural habitat and observe them and observe where they are not. A big part of bringing awareness is to show the future without these little creatures. I also think humans do not know the impact that will happen if we fail to help these creatures. I sought out to show an aspect of observing bees gathering pollen from local flowers and then to show the flowers with missing bees because of the decline in the bee population.